>Missional mothering

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Good stuff from Jani Ortland

 

Mother: You have a mission field

Our first and primary mission field is our children. God values our children. Jesus became indignant when the disciples didn’t embrace the worth of children in God’s expanding kingdom (Mark 10:13-16). God tells us that children are his blessing to us (Ps. 127:3). And he places great importance on our teaching our children to love and serve him (Deut. 6:7-9).
Don’t feel guilty over making your children your primary ministry investment in their early years. Your availability, sensitivity, affection, and unhurried attention are irreplaceable.
There are no neutral moments in a young child’s life. Someone is going to be influencing your children, inculcating values and imprinting standards on their impressionable young minds. Let it be you!
Accept your calling from God to serve your family. As a mother, you are helping to shape the souls of your children for Christ and ultimately influence the world. Your children are your gift to the future.

Stay on mission

Does this mean you will never invest in others outside your family? Goodness, no. But if you are a young mother, stay on mission. Use your primary ministry of mothering to serve Christ now. Don’t let anything diminish your unique role as a wife and mother. It is not godly guilt that would call you away from a wholehearted investment in your little ones for his sake.

Don’t feel guilty over making your children your primary ministry investment in their early years.

This season in your life is just that—a season. And each season is a divine calling from our creator and king. Organizing a new event at church is important. Teaching your little boy to be kind to his sister is also important. But which one can best be done by you during this season? Serve God well by ministering to your children first. Very soon they will be grown and gone, and you will be unable to recapture the teachable moments you have now.
Mothers, listen to Psalm 78:4-7: “We will . . . tell to the coming generation the glorious deeds of the Lord, and his might, and the wonders he has done . . . that the next generation might know . . . so that they should set their hope in God.”

>Parenting Particulars

>This remains challenging, convicting, and comforting, from RUTH”S blog

10 Things To Remember When Your Child Is Disobedient

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Here are 10 Things I had to remind myself today when the job of correcting my children felt especially difficult…

1. You disobey the Lord…and He is the perfect Father.

2. His kindness leads us to repentance.

3. God disciplines those He loves.

4. Your child’s disobedience does not measure your value any more than his obedience showcases your achievement.

5. Your child’s disobedience teaches you dependence on God.

6. And sometimes it’s more than dependence He’s after, it’s complete desperation for Him.

7. Your child is clearly a sinner, and needs to hear the truth of the Gospel, and see it lived out through you.

8. Times of correction serve to remind, or establish within your child, his own sense of need for a Savior.

9. It’s not good behavior you really desire…you want his heart.

10. Your child is a person, not a project.

>A "Wow" From Tim Keller

>Just got clobbered as I read, reread, and thought about this from Tim Keller:

“You need to get used to this reality. Once you become a parent, for the rest of your life, you’ll never be happier than your unhappiest child, because your heart is tied to your kids. That is a way of learning the gospel because before you have kids you don’t really know what it means that God suffers for your sins. He has to. He has to suffer for your sins, because when you have children you suffer for their sins. Your heart is tied up to them.”

>The Job of a Parent

>This is from Mark Batterson’s blog (author of “Wild Goose Chase” mentioned a few postings ago)…

I feel like my job as a parent is to teach my kid’s three phrases: please, thank you, and I’m sorry. Those three phrases are three keys that will open any door.

Please” symbolizes a humble approach to life without a sense of entitlement. It is the magic word. Or think of it as the master key. A simple “please” will open doors nothing else can.

Thank you” symbolizes a grateful heart. When you stop saying “thank you” it stops the flow of blessing. But if you genuinely thank people when they do something for you, it keeps the door open.

And “I’m sorry” symbolizes courage. Why? Because it takes tremendous courage to admit that you were wrong. But if you learn to say “I’m sorry” when you make a mistake it reopens doors that have been closed.

So to recap…

“Please” opens doors. “Thank You” keeps them open. And “I’m sorry” reopens closed doors.

I know that sounds awfully simplistic. But the happiest and healthiest people are the people who are really good at those three things. They have mastered the three phrases. p